History and Social Studies

Pathway Pumas


 
   
 

Social Studies 7

   

Seventh grade Social Studies is a course designed to expose our students to a panoramic journey through American History beginning with The American Civil War and leading up to the events that caused WWII. The Students will explore early American immigration through Ellis Island, American Imperialism, WWI, and information on The Great Depression and how it helped America bring itself out of this Economic Tragedy, with the involvement in WWII.

This course will place major emphasis on Common Core reading and writing standards like analysis, synthesis, critical thinking of the social, economic, political, religious and geographic influences and developments during this time period. The students will learn to research the information and create their own on opinions on history. They will work on gathering the facts that support their view and learn how to prove the point with facts and not opinions. A copy of the Primary and Secondary sources will be provided in class and available to take home.

By the end of this course, students will be able to write about how they see Social Studies differently. They will learn that Social Studies is millions of events that that they get to discover and decide for themselves, what happened, based on the evidence they pull out of whatever source they are using. They will know how to take ownership of history and learn to research, form an opinion using their new techniques to analyze the data and then supply evidence to support their opinion.

 



 
   
 

Social Studies 7 Honors

   

Criteria for placement in Grade 7 Social Studies Honors is based on teacher recommendation, overall grade and performance on summative assessments.

Honors Social Studies 7 goes beyond Social Studies 7 with extended learning activities that require students to increase their use of critical thinking skills to include analysis, synthesis, and problem solving. The curriculum moves at an accelerated pace with a more concentrated focus.

 



 
   
 

Social Studies 8

   

Eighth grade Social Studies will consist of an enhanced version of the Arizona State Social Studies Standards with an emphasis on comprehension, application, analysis, and performance assessments that focus on synthesis and evaluation. This course will convey to the students the purpose of studying history and ultimately relay how it currently affects us. One will be able to notice common core standards incorporated through this course. Current events will be utilized throughout the course in order to link historical events to present day events and how understanding history is vital to understanding the world around you. Students will be taught critical thinking skills and critical writing skills in a cross-curricular fashion with their language arts course.

After completing this course, students will be able to show the knowledge and understanding of underlying meanings of the topics covered and why it is relevant to life in today's society. Our students are expected to come to this course with a basic knowledge of the concepts being taught at this level from previous year's experiences. Additionally, the students should be prepared to apply critical thinking, writing, and reading skills for successful high school academic achievement. The students should be able to clearly articulate their ideas on a variety of topics, and express those ideas with confidence.

  Prerequisites:
Social Studies 7


 
   
 

Social Studies 8 Honors

   

Criteria for placement in Grade 8 Social Studies Honors is based on teacher recommendation, overall grade and performance on summative assessments.

Honors Social Studies 8 goes beyond Social Studies 8 with extended learning activities that require students to increase their use of critical thinking skills to include analysis, synthesis, and problem solving. The curriculum moves at an accelerated pace with a more concentrated focus.

  Prerequisites:
Social Studies 7


   
 

AZ/US History

 

Instructor: Justin Price
E-Mail:jprice@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

A study of American History is integral for students to analyze our national experience through time, to recognize the relationships of events and people, and to interpret significant patterns, themes, ideas, beliefs, and turning points in Arizona and American history. Students will be able to apply the lessons of American History to their lives as citizens of the United States. Students will be able to compare historical events and current events happening in the country today and draw conclusions and inferences between them. The study of Arizona is important so that students know the area around them and can make informed decisions as they move into adulthood.

Students will be instructed through lecture, and group and individual studies. Students will conduct individual research on a specific event or person and report their findings to the class. Students will utilize charts and graphs to find and discuss historical trends and detail specific events or data. Formative and summative assessments are a constant in this classroom to best track student progress and better assist in best teaching strategies for the individual student.

This course is a political and social history of the United States and Arizona, emphasizing the founding of the United States and the period from the colonial period to the present. Particular attention is given to the Revolutionary War, Civil War, Industrial Revolution, Expansionism, WWI, Roaring 20’s, Great Depression, WWII, Korean War, Vietnam War and other details. In addition to their textbooks, students will use maps, primary source documents, secondary readings, and videos in their work, and will write analytical essays. Students will also look into their own family history and try to discovery their own history.

Prerequisites:
None

 
Required Materials:
  • 3-ring binder
  • Loose leaf paper
  • 1-pack 3x5 cards
  • Highlighter
  • Pencils (#2 and colored, if desired)

   
 

Economics

 

Instructor: Justin Price
E-Mail:jprice@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

The goal of the economics strand is to enable students to make reasoned judgments about both personal economic questions and broader questions of economic policy. Students will develop an economic way of thinking and problem solving to understand and apply basic economic principles to decisions they will make as consumers, members of the workforce, citizens, voters, and participants in a global marketplace. This will prepare students to weigh both short-term and long-term effects of decisions as well as possible unintended consequences. Students will study the stock market and have a basic understanding of how it works; students will also look at global markets and have a basic understanding of how the world is globally connected.

Students will be instructed through lecture, and group and individual studies. Material from Dave Ramsey’s, Foundations in Personal Finance will be used to develop an understanding of personal finance for students. Students will compete with each other in a stock market game and learn about investing and retirement accounts. Formative and summative assessments are a constant in this classroom to best track student progress and better assist in best teaching strategies for the individual student.

Economics: Successful completion of Economics requires students to demonstrate an understanding of basic economic concepts. Students become familiar with the economic system of the United States and how it operates. They also explore the roles of various components of the American economic system. Students examine their roles as consumer, worker, investor and voting citizen. Topics of discussion include the Stock Market, comparative economic systems, and the impact of political and social decisions on the economy.

 
Required Materials:
  • 3-ring binder
  • Loose leaf paper
  • Highlighter
  • Pencils (#2 and colored, if desired)

   
 

Government

 

Instructor: Justin Price
E-Mail:jprice@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

The goal of the civics strand is to develop the requisite knowledge and skills for informed, responsible participation in public life; to ensure, through instruction, that students understand the essentials, source, and history of the constitutions of the United States and Arizona, American institutions and ideals (ARS 15-710). Students will understand the foundations, principles, and institutional practices of the United States as a representative democracy and constitutional republic.

They will understand the importance of each person as an individual with human and civil rights and our shared heritage in the United States. Students will understand politics, government, and the responsibilities of good citizenship. Citizenship skills include the capacity to influence policies and decisions by clearly communicating interests and the ability to build coalitions through negotiation, compromise, and consensus. In addition, students will learn that the United States influences and is influenced by global interaction. Students will be instructed through lecture and group and individual studies. Students will utilize charts and graphs to find and discuss historical trends and detail specific events or data. Formative and summative assessments are a constant in this classroom to best track student progress and better assist in best teaching strategies for the individual student. Students will be challenged to get involved and be aware of local elections, policies, and events that will impact them currently, or in the near future.

Government: The goal of the Government course is to help students acquire the knowledge necessary to be active participants in American society. This course assists students in becoming aware of their roles as citizens and helps them evaluate public issues, make informed judgments, and provide an understanding of how a person's values affect their decision ¬making process. Students acquire knowledge of how citizens have in the past, and can now and in the future, directly and indirectly interact with the public policy processes. Student’s will finish this course with a better understanding of who they are as a person and what they value when it comes to voting for candidates and laws.

 
Required Materials:
  • 3-ring binder
  • Loose leaf paper
  • One pack of 3x5 cards
  • Highlighter
  • Pencils (#2 and colored, if desired)

   
 

Honors AZ / US History

 

Instructor: Justin Price
E-Mail:jprice@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

A study of American and Arizonan History is integral for students to analyze our national experience through time, to recognize the relationships of events and people, and to interpret significant patterns, themes, ideas, beliefs, and turning points in Arizona and American history. Students will be able to apply the lessons of American and Arizonan History to their lives as citizens of the United States. Students will be able to compare historical events and current events happening in the country today and draw conclusions and inferences between them. The study of Arizona is important so that students know the area around them and can make informed decisions as they move into adulthood.

Students will be instructed through lecture, and group and individual studies. Students will conduct individual research on a specific event or person and report their findings to the class. Students will utilize charts and graphs to find and discuss historical trends and detail specific events or data. Formative and summative assessments are a constant in this classroom to best track student progress and better assist in best teaching strategies for the individual student. Honors students are held to a higher level of accountability in all of their work. Participation in discussions is not optional and is a mandatory and important part of learning in the classroom. Students must respect each other in the classroom at all times to foster this type of learning environment where all students are free to share their opinions.

This course is a political and social history of the United States and Arizona, emphasizing the founding of the United States and the period from the colonial period to the present. Particular attention is given to the Revolutionary War, Civil War, Industrial Revolution, Expansionism, WWI, Roaring 20’s, Great Depression, WWII, Korean War, Vietnam War and other details. In addition to their textbooks, students will use maps, primary source documents, secondary readings, and videos in their work, and will write analytical essays. Students will also look into their own family history and try to discovery their own history.

 
Required Materials:
  • 3-ring binder
  • Loose leaf paper
  • One pack of 3x5 cards
  • Highlighter
  • Pencils (#2 and colored, if desired)

   
 

Honors Economics

 

Instructor: Justin Price
E-Mail:jprice@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

The goal of the economics strand is to enable students to make reasoned judgments about both personal economic questions and broader questions of economic policy. Students will develop an economic way of thinking and problem solving to understand and apply basic economic principles to decisions they will make as consumers, members of the workforce, citizens, voters, and participants in a global marketplace. This will prepare students to weigh both short-term and long-term effects of decisions as well as possible unintended consequences.

Students will be instructed through lecture, and group and individual studies. Formative and summative assessments are a constant in this classroom to best track student progress and better assist in best teaching strategies for the individual student.

Honors Economics: This course is the traditional, college level survey/seminar elective in the study of Economics. The study of economics explains historical developments and patterns, the results of trade, and the distribution of income and wealth in local, regional, national, and world economies. Students will be able to analyze current issues and public policies and to understand the complex relationships among economic, political, and cultural systems. Students will compete in a stock market exercise to better understand the market and how it can fluctuate. Students will learn investment strategies and understand long term economic outcomes. Dave Ramsey’s book Foundations in Personal Finance will be used to give students a financial framework to live in as they become adults and move out into the real world. This will help them to be fiscally responsible and will provide them with long term financial knowledge that is needed to succeed in the world today.
Prerequisites:
None

 
Required Materials:
  • 3-ring binder
  • Loose leaf paper
  • Highlighter
  • Pencils (#2 and colored, if desired)

   
 

Honors Government

 

Instructor: Justin Price
E-Mail:jprice@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

The goal of the civics strand is to develop the requisite knowledge and skills for informed, responsible participation in public life; to ensure, through instruction, that students understand the essentials, source, and history of the constitutions of the United States and Arizona, American institutions and ideals (ARS 15-710). Students will understand the foundations, principles, and institutional practices of the United States as a representative democracy and constitutional republic.

They will understand the importance of each person as an individual with human and civil rights and our shared heritage in the United States. Students will understand politics, government, and the responsibilities of good citizenship. Citizenship skills include the capacity to influence policies and decisions by clearly communicating interests and the ability to build coalitions through negotiation, compromise, and consensus. In addition, students will learn that the United States influences and is influenced by global interaction.

Honors Government: This course is the traditional, college level survey/seminar elective in the study of American government. The major emphasis is placed on the study of American political ideology and the evolution of its democratic institutions. The course's purpose is to demonstrate the political behavior of the American and Arizonan electorate, the function of its citizens and their involvement in the local, state, and national structures of the American political system. Students will be challenged to get involved in the current years cycle of elections by researching candidates at all levels prior to the November election.

Students will be able to evaluate the role of the national government and its relationship to the concept of liberty in a pluralistic society. Discussions will emphasize the changing political culture of American society and its effect on voting patterns, trends and the processes in government. Students will write analytical essays and a major research paper. Daily assigned reading outside of class is mandatory for success. When students complete this course they will have a much deeper knowledge of their own political ideologies and be prepared to make informed decisions in the voting booth.

 
Required Materials:
  • 3-ring binder
  • Loose leaf paper
  • One pack of 3x5 cards
  • Highlighter
  • Pencils (#2 and colored, if desired)

   
 

Social Studies 7 & 8

 

Instructor: Melissa Kurasek
E-Mail:mkurasek@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

JJunior high social studies courses will consist of an enhanced version of the Arizona State Social Studies Standards with an emphasis on comprehension, application, analysis, and performance assessments that focus on synthesis and evaluation. This course will convey to the students the purpose of studying history and ultimately relay how it currently affects us. One will be able to notice common core standards incorporated through this course.

Testing is provided throughout the year to ensure comprehension of topics are complimented by teacher created projects, technology, integrated student research; reports and other resources. Current events will be utilized throughout the course in order to link historical events to present day events and how understanding history is vital to understanding the world around you. Students will be taught critical thinking skills and critical writing skills in a cross-curricular fashion with their language arts course.

After completing this course, students will be able to show the knowledge and understanding of underlying meanings of the topics covered and why it is relevant to life in today's society. Our students are expected to come to this course with a basic knowledge of the concepts being taught at this level from previous year's experiences. Additionally, the students should be prepared to apply critical thinking, writing, and reading skills for successful high school academic achievement. The students should be able to clearly articulate their ideas on a variety of topics, and express those ideas with confidence.

 

   
 

Social Studies 7

 

Instructor: Melissa Kurasek
E-Mail:mkurasek@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

Seventh grade Social Studies is a course designed to expose our students to a panoramic journey through American History beginning with The American Civil War and leading up to the events that caused WWII. The Students will explore early American immigration through Ellis Island, American Imperialism, WWI, and information on The Great Depression and how it helped America bring itself out of this Economic Tragedy, with the involvement in WWII.

This course will place major emphasis on Common Core reading and writing standards like analysis, synthesis, critical thinking of the social, economic, political, religious and geographic influences and developments during this time period. The students will learn to research the information and create their own on opinions on history. They will work on gathering the facts that support their view and learn how to prove the point with facts and not opinions. A copy of the Primary and Secondary sources will be provided in class and available to take home.

By the end of this course, students will be able to write about how they see Social Studies differently. They will learn that Social Studies is millions of events that that they get to discover and decide for themselves, what happened, based on the evidence they pull out of whatever source they are using. They will know how to take ownership of history and learn to research, form an opinion using their new techniques to analyze the data and then supply evidence to support their opinion.