English – Language Arts

Pathway Pumas


 
   
 

English 7

   

In the English 7 course, students will continue to develop communication and critical thinking skills through reading, writing, and listening skills in alignment with the Arizona State Standards. Students will read and analyze different genres of literature including novels, non-fiction articles, informative passages, short stories, and poems. Students will explore several types of writing, including paragraphs, essays and poems. Assignments and projects will be created by combining areas of study, literacy terms, technology, research strategies, and writing skills. Independent reading is expected, with pertinent writing assignments being given on a regular basis. Learning to work collaboratively is essential, so group/partners work will be a routine occurrence.

Upon completing this course, students will be able to read and comprehend different styles of literature. Students will also be able to develop thought provoking essays using appropriate form and function.

  Prerequisites:
None.
This is a required ELA class.


 
   
 

English 7 Honors

   

Criteria for placement in Grade 7 Honors English– Teacher recommendation, overall grade and performance on summative assessments.

In 7th grade Honors English, students will take an advanced approach to developing proficient communication skills through critical reading, writing, speaking, and listening, as set forth in the Arizona Core Standards. Students will be expected to read, analyze, and interpret a variety of literature, including, works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will demonstrate their comprehension and analytical skills through a variety of written assignments and presentations.

Students will be asked to creatively demonstrate their learning through the use of technology and project-based assignments. In this course, students will be challenged to think “outside-the-box” in order to make connections between texts, their own lives, and the world around them.

  Prerequisites:
None.


 
   
 

English 8

   

The English 8 course addresses reading, writing, listening and speaking within a rigorous standards-based program. Instruction will include reading comprehension, writing in narrative, argumentative, and informative/explanatory, language conventions, vocabulary development in meaningful contexts, and reference skills. Students will study various genres including the short story, novel, drama, biography, poetry, and informational materials as dictated by Arizona Common Core Standards. Our eighth grade students are introduced to the rigorous expectations of high school in English 8 and students are taught to connect their concrete knowledge to more abstract levels of thinking.

  Prerequisites:
English 7


 
   
 

English 8 Honors

   

Criteria for placement in Grade 8 Honors English– Teacher recommendation, overall grade and performance on summative assessments.

Honors goes beyond English 8 with extended learning activities that require students to increase their use of critical thinking skills to include analysis, synthesis, and problem solving. The curriculum moves at an accelerated pace with a more concentrated focus.

 



 
   
 

Language Arts 8

 

Instructor: Wendy Black 
E-Mail: wblack@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333 ext 11058

The goal of the Middle School Language Arts program is to provide students with the opportunity to develop both oral and written communication skills. The curriculum will foster both the social and emotional growth of the students as they are asked to examine their role in the world through literature and writing. Literature selections will also be made in correlation with Social Studies, so as to provide an interdisciplinary approach to learning. In an attempt to create a holistic language experience, the components of this course will include grammar practice, literature analysis, writing activities, and oral presentations. Students will be given the opportunity to develop grade level skills in the areas of literacy, comprehension, writing, speaking, and listening.

As the Common Core Standards are fully implemented, the curriculum focus will be on expository reading and writing. A cross-curricular bridge to Social Studies will allow students to read and respond to texts that are meaningful to their learning. Classic literature and short story selections are chosen based on their relevance to the students' lives. Thought¬ provoking discussion and meaningful literary responses are the result. Vocabulary is implicitly taught and practiced. Lessons are delivered in a variety of formats to ensure all learning styles are being addressed; for example, video presentations, peer grouping, hands-on learning projects, and direct vocabulary instruction. Formative and summative assessments are a constant in this classroom to best track student progress and better assist in best teaching strategies for the individual student. District benchmarks are performed four times a year.

Upon completing this course students will have acquired and utilized grade level vocabulary in oral and written assignments. Through the study and practice of language and grammar conventions, students will achieve grade level appropriate writing and speaking skills. Students will demonstrate an understanding of literary devices and the techniques necessary to produce various formats of writing: descriptive, narrative, expository, and persuasive. Students will demonstrate active listening skills and express their ideas orally in the course of discussions.

Prerequisites:
None.

 
Required Materials:
  • 1 dedicated spiral notebook with loose leaf paper and a composition book (class journal)
  • Highlighters
  • Black / Red Pens
  • Flash drive
Literature Selections:
  • Tears of a Tiger
  • The Merchant of Venice
  • The Boy in the Striped Pajamas
  • A Night to Remember

 
   
 

English 9

 

Instructor: Wendy Black 
E-Mail: wblack@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333 ext 11058

The English 9 course is an overview of classic literature across the major forms and genres (short story, novel, poetry, drama, epic poetry, and literary non-fiction) designed to broaden opportunities for reading pleasure and develop competency in writing, listening, and speaking. This course of study exposes the student to the various forms of literature from all parts of the world and deals with the universal problems of human nature. In line with the school policy, considerable attention is paid to the development of writing skills through regularly assigned essays, compositions, journals and letters. Emphasis is placed on grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, and spelling. Students write regularly and based on literature, current events, and/ or student experiences. Speeches are incorporated into the curriculum in a variety of ways, as well. Students are expected to become thoroughly familiar with MLA research skills and will complete several research projects.

Students in English 9 will engage in learning tasks that will emphasize State Standards in reading, writing, language, and speaking and listening. Students will explore the ways that audience, purpose, and context shape oral communication, written communication, and media and technology.

Students will engage in meaningful communication for expressive, expository, argumentative, and literary purposes. Students will participate in online activities and communication to develop 21st Century skills and literacy.

By the end of this course, students will be able to write clearly and effectively to persuade their audience, argue their position, and support their position with properly cited and well documented evidence. They will be confident working alone, with others and will have the skills needed to put their best face forward in the workplace of tomorrow.

Prerequisites:
None.

 
Required Materials:
  • 1 dedicated spiral notebook with loose leaf paper and a composition book (class journal)
  • Highlighters
  • Black / Red Pens
  • Flash drive
Literature Selections:
  • To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Romeo & Juliet
  • The Outsiders
  • Lord of the Flies

   
 

English 10

 

Instructor: Brian F. Hankins 
E-Mail: bhankins@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

This one-year English course continues the critical analysis of literature by combining reading, writing, speaking and listening as well as oral and written English language conventions introduced in English 9. This course further prepares students for higher level English courses and testing. This course emphasizes critical thinking skills and development of ideas in class discussion, writing and formal speaking opportunities. Students will advance their use of the Writing Process through a variety of writing modes, with both assisted and unassisted writing assignments; descriptive, persuasive and expository essays will be taught. Students will read texts from various genres including poetry, novels, non-fiction, drama, and functional documents. Students will use skills necessary for competent reading and writing by focusing on language mechanics, vocabulary development, and specific reading and writing assignments.

English 10 features reading, writing, listening, and speaking exercises where you read and analyze fiction, poetry, drama, and informational texts. You will produce and evaluate writing exercises, including poetry, plays, comparison-contrast essays, persuasive essays, cause/effect essays, and analyses of nonfiction. You will also deliver and evaluate oral presentations.

By the end of this course, students will be able to write clearly and effectively to persuade their audience, argue their position, and support their position with properly cited and well documented evidence. They will be confident working alone, with others and will have the skills needed to put their best face forward in the workplace of tomorrow.

Arizona standards for English Language Arts are the backbone of the course so expect to read, write, question, analyze and perform daily!

Prerequisites:
Students must have completed English 9.

 

Required Materials:
  • Loose leaf paper (college ruled)
  • A folder
  • 2 spiral notebooks
  • Pens and pencils
  • A flash drive
Literature Selections:
  • Animal Farm
  • Of Mice and Men
  • The Grapes of Wrath
  • Frankenstein

   
 

English 11

 

Instructor: Brian Hankins 
E-Mail: bhankins@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333 ext 11064

English 11 is a broad survey of American Literature, encompassing poetry, drama, short stories, novels and nonfiction. The primary goals of the course are to develop critical thinking skills as relates to literature and society, to understand and appreciate the importance of literature in history and contemporary society, and to develop effective written and oral communication skills that empower students to succeed in a demanding global economy. Students will learn about literature in the context of the broader American historical and political climate in which it was written, to further underscore the connection between literature and the development of our American democracy and unique American voice. There will be a strong emphasis on vocabulary development, civil discourse, and engaging texts on a deeper level. The class will be writing intensive, with a focus on rhetorical and argumentative essays, and students will learn how to appropriately cite their work in both MLA and APA format.

Students will be exposed to a range of writers, from Hawthorne to Hemingway, and asked to evaluate the texts in a variety of formats. Through the multiple lenses of literary, social, personal, and historical analysis, students will see each work as much more than a simple story or poem. Rather, they will see the complex art form of writing, and in turn, become more articulate, effective and thoughtful writers themselves. Students will produce a variety of essays, two proposals, two short stories, a poem, narrative nonfiction, and a short story.

By the end of this course, students will be able to write clearly and effectively to persuade their audience, argue their position, and support their position with properly cited and well documented evidence. They will be confident speakers, having engaged in myriad discussions, and will have the skills needed to put their best face forward in the workplace of tomorrow. They will be familiar with a range of both classic and critically regarded contemporary literature, and will understand the function and role of literature within society.

Prerequisites:
Students must have completed English 10

 
Required Materials:
  • Loose leaf paper (college ruled)
  • A folder
  • 2 spiral notebooks
  • Pens and pencils
  • A flash drive

Literature Selections:
  • The Great Gatsby
  • The Things They Carried
  • The Red Badge of Courage
  • Frankenstein

   
 

English 12

 

Instructor: Lauren Miller
E-Mail:lmiller@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

English 12 is a broad survey of British and World Literature, encompassing poetry, drama, short stories, novels and nonfiction. The primary goals of the course are to develop critical thinking skills as relates to literature and society, to understand and appreciate the importance of literature in history and contemporary society, and to develop effective written and oral communication skills that empower students to succeed in a demanding global economy. Students will learn about literature in the context of the broader historical and political climate in which it was written and to further underscore the connection between literature and culture at large. There will be a strong emphasis on vocabulary development, civil discourse, and engaging texts on a deeper level. The class will be writing intensive, with a focus on rhetorical and argumentative essays and students will learn how to appropriately cite their work in both MLA and APA format.

Students will be exposed to a range of writers, from Shakespeare to Kafka, and asked to evaluate the texts in a variety of formats. Through the multiple lenses of literary, social, personal, and historical analysis, students will see each work as much more than a simple story or poem. Rather, they will see the complex art form of writing, and in turn, become more articulate, effective and thoughtful writers themselves. Students will produce a variety of essays, two proposals, two short stories, a poem, narrative nonfiction, a cover letter and resume by the year’s end, as well as a statement of personal intent if they are college bound.

By the end of this course, students will be able to write clearly and effectively to persuade their audience, argue their position, and support their position with properly cited and well documented evidence. They will be confident speakers, having engaged in myriad discussions, and will have the skills needed to put their best face forward in the workplace of tomorrow. They will be familiar with a range of both classic and critically regarded contemporary literature, and will understand the function and role of literature within society.


Prerequisites:
Students must have completed English 11

 
Required Materials:
  • A 1" binder exclusively for this class
  • 2 folders
  • A spiral notebook
  • A highlighter
  • Black and red pens
  • A flash drive

Literature Selections:
  • Macbeth by William Shakespeare
  • Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  • Dracula by Bram Stoker
  • 1984 by George Orwell

   
 

Honors English 11 / AP Language and Composition

 

Instructor: Lauren Miller
E-Mail:lmiller@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

Honors English 11/AP Language and Composition is a broad survey of American Literature, encompassing poetry, drama, short stories, novels and a significant amount of nonfiction. The purpose of this course is twofold, depending on whether you are taking it as AP or Honors; the goal for all students is to well-prepare them for further study at the college level and will be conducted much like a college level course. The second goal, for students that have elected to enroll as AP, is to prepare students for the rigor of the College Board Advanced Placement exam in the Spring, where they will have an opportunity to earn college credit. We will focus on developing effective annotation skills, critically thinking and writing at an elevated level, and engaging in vigorous, lively discussion and debate. There will be a strong vocabulary building component, as well exposure to seminal classic literary works and historical United States documents, with a strong foundation in critically regarded contemporary writers. Students will learn about each text within the context of the historical and political climate in which it was written, and will be expected to learn the broader social and cultural implications of each text, including the role of specific texts in the shaping of the unique American democratic republic.

This class will make frequent use of the Socratic seminar as a vehicle for lively discussion and debate and for furthering student understanding and engagement. Students will be taught to annotate each text in detail so that they may reference these notes when writing their essays. Students will be expected to create works cited pages in both the MLA and APA style. Also, students in the Honors English program will collaborate to produce a literary magazine which will serve as an opportunity for them to learn the basics of editing, layout and production of a periodical.

By the end of this course, students will know how to effectively annotate and how to write an effective argumentative essay in both MLA and APA style. They will be very familiar with a wide range of classical and contemporary texts, both fiction and nonfiction in nature, and will be able to discuss these works and their deeper meanings and implications at length. They will understand the importance and role of key American writings and historical texts, and their role in the formation of the United States. They will be able to write a short story, poems, and narrative nonfiction in an engaging way, and will be able to copy edit and layout a magazine.


Prerequisites:
Students will be admitted to Honors English with instructor approval, based on a combination of benchmark scores and prior year English grades. Students also must have passed both reading and writing portions of AIMS to be considered.

 
Required Materials:
  • A 1" binder exclusively for this class
  • 2 folders
  • A spiral notebook
  • A highlighter
  • Black and red pens
  • A flash drive
  • Students in this class will also be asked to obtain copies of their own books at times, such as for the summer reading lists and when a text is not available through the school. It is best for students in Honors English to have their own copies of novels, as this allows students to directly highlight and annotate within the novel, as one would do in college.

Literature Selections:
  • The Great Gatsby
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God
  • On The Road
  • The Things They Carried
  • As I Lay Dying
  • Additional short stories, poems, and essays by American writers or merit, including Nathaniel Hawthorne, Flannery O'Conner, Ernest Hemingway, Edgar Allen Poe, and more.

   
 

Honors English 12

 

Instructor: Lauren Miller
E-Mail:lmiller@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

Honors English 12 is a broad survey of British and World Literature, encompassing poetry, drama, short stories, novels and nonfiction. The purpose of this course is to well prepare students for further study at the college level, and will be conducted much like a college level course. This course is designed to focus on our roles as global citizens, and draws on texts from a wide variety of cultures and historical eras. We will focus on developing effective annotation skills, critically thinking and writing at an elevated level, and engaging in vigorous and lively discussion and debate. There will be a strong vocabulary building component, as well exposure to seminal classic literary works, in addition to a strong foundation in critically regarded contemporary writers. Students will learn about each text within the context of the historical and political climate in which it was written, focusing on the relationship between world events. Students will be writing several essays, predominantly argumentative or persuasive in nature, and will be expected to do substantial research for their papers, using in-text citations in both MLA and APA format, as well as mixed media research projects and presentations.

This class will make frequent use of the Socratic seminar as a vehicle for lively discussion and debate, and for furthering student understanding and engagement. Students will be taught and expected to annotate each text in detail, so that they may reference these notes when writing their essays. Students will be taught and expected to create works cited pages in both the MLA and APA style. Also, students in the Honors English program will collaborate to produce a literary magazine which will serve as an opportunity for them to learn the basics of editing, layout and production of a periodical.

By the end of this course, students will know how to effectively annotate- a critical skill for college success, and how to write an effective argumentative essay in both MLA and APA style. They will know how to effectively conduct and cite research, and how to utilize ethos, pathos and logos. They will be able to identify key writers and poets, and the literary movements with which they are associated. They will be able to write a short story, poems, and narrative nonfiction in an engaging way, and will be able to copy edit and layout a magazine.


Prerequisites:
Students will be admitted to Honors English with instructor approval, based on a combination of benchmark scores and prior year English grades. Students also must have passed both reading and writing portions of AIMS to be considered.

 
Required Materials:
  • A 1" binder exclusively for this class
  • 2 folders
  • A spiral notebook
  • A highlighter
  • Black and red pens
  • A flash drive
  • Students in this class will also be asked to obtain copies of their own books at times, such as for the summer reading lists and when a text is not available through the school. It is best for students in Honors English to have their own copies of novels, as this allows students to directly highlight and annotate within the novel, as one would do in college.

Literature Selections:
  • Hamlet (or King Lear) by William Shakespeare
  • Siddhartha by Herman Hesse
  • A Tale of Two Cities or Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  • Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  • 1984 by George Orwell
  • Many other short stories, essays, and poems

   
 

Honors English 12 / AP Literature and Composition

 

Instructor: Lauren Miller
E-Mail:lmiller@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

Honors English 12/AP Literature and Composition is a broad survey of British and World Literature, encompassing poetry, drama, short stories, novels and nonfiction. The purpose of this course is twofold, depending on whether you are taking it as AP or Honors; the goal for all students is to well-prepare them for further study at the college level and will be conducted much like a college level course. The second goal, for students that have elected to enroll as AP, is to prepare students for the rigor of the College Board Advanced Placement exam in the Spring, where they will have an opportunity to earn college credit. This course is designed to focus on our roles as global citizens, and draws on texts from a wide variety of cultures and historical eras. We will focus on developing effective annotation skills, critically thinking and writing at an elevated level, and engaging in vigorous and lively discussion and debate. There will be a strong vocabulary building component, as well exposure to seminal classic literary works, in addition to a strong foundation in critically regarded contemporary writers. Students will learn about each text within the context of the historical and political climate in which it was written, focusing on the relationship between world events. Students will be writing several essays, predominantly argumentative or persuasive in nature, and will be expected to do substantial research for their papers, using in-text citations in both MLA and APA format, as well as mixed media research projects and presentations.

This class will make frequent use of the Socratic seminar as a vehicle for lively discussion and debate, and for furthering student understanding and engagement. Students will be taught and expected to annotate each text in detail, so that they may reference these notes when writing their essays. Students will be taught and expected to create works cited pages in both the MLA and APA style.

By the end of this course, students will know how to effectively annotate- a critical skill for college success, and how to write an effective argumentative essay in both MLA and APA style. They will know how to effectively conduct and cite research, and how to utilize ethos, pathos and logos. They will be able to identify key writers and poets, and the literary movements with which they are associated. They will be able to write a short story, poems, and narrative nonfiction in an engaging way.


Prerequisites:
Students will be admitted to Honors English with instructor approval, based on a combination of benchmark scores and prior year English grades. Students also must have passed both reading and writing portions of AIMS to be considered.

 
Required Materials:
  • A 1" binder exclusively for this class
  • 2 folders
  • A spiral notebook
  • A highlighter
  • Black and red pens
  • A flash drive
  • Students in this class will also be asked to obtain copies of their own books at times, such as for the summer reading lists and when a text is not available through the school. It is best for students in Honors English to have their own copies of novels, as this allows students to directly highlight and annotate within the novel, as one would do in college.

Literature Selections:
  • Hamlet (or King Lear) by William Shakespeare
  • Siddhartha by Herman Hesse
  • A Tale of Two Cities or Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  • Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  • 1984 by George Orwell
  • Many other short stories, essays, and poems