Electives and Fine Arts

Pathway Pumas


 
   
 

Keyboarding

   

This course is for 7th - 8th grades only.
Typing/Computer Skills is designed to help students develop speed and accuracy by learning the touch operation of alphanumeric/keyboard characters. Emphasis is also placed on learning web-based applications such as Google Docs, Google Sheets, Google Slides, as well as efficient Google Searching skills. This is a one semester class.

  Prerequisites:
None.


 
   
 

Beginning/Advanced Band

   

This course is for 7th - 12th grades.
Beginning/Advanced Band will focus on the basics of playing a band instrument (flute, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, tuba, and percussion) and continue band for students with previous experience playing an instrument. Students will learn how to hold, take care of, and play the instruments, follow a conductor, maintain a steady practice routine, and how to play in a large group with mixed instruments. Students that have previous experience playing a wind or percussion instrument, will continue to progress with their instruments. Students in Advanced Band will be expected to participate in both Winter and Spring concerts as a major part of their grade. Students will also need to rent an instrument from Milano Music.

  Prerequisites:
None.
Required:
Instrument


 
   
 

Beginning Choir

   

This course is recommended for 6th - 12th grades.
Beginning Choir is a year-long course that explores music from a wide variety of cultures and time periods through study and performances. This choir is for male and female students, singing in unison and 2 part songs. The following musical skills for ensemble singing will be stressed: proper breathing, pleasant vocal production, blend and balance, expansion of range, good intonation, ear training and sight reading. Students in beginning choir are expected to participate in both the Winter and Spring concerts as a major part of their grade.

  Prerequisites:
None.


 
   
 

Guitar

   

This course is recommended for 7th - 12th grades.
Guitar will cover the basics of guitar and an application of essential music fundamentals. Students will learn the basics of playing guitar at a beginning level through studying music notation, chord symbols, and peer modeling. A brief history of the guitar along with a study of its perspective musical styles will also be covered in this course. The main objective of this course is to create an enhanced appreciation for music through playing the guitar. Students will learn how to read music notation, chord symbols, and tablature. Students will also gain a better understanding of many different musical genres including classical, blues, jazz, and rock. Students in guitar will be expected to participate in both Winter and Spring concerts as a major part of their grade. Rentals are available at Milano Music.

  Prerequisites:
None.

Required:
Acoustic Guitar

 
   
 

Study Hall

   

Study hall is designed to provide students opportunity to complete homework during school hours, as well as get additional assistance and instruction.

  Prerequisites:
None.


 
   
 

JH Math Lab

   

Junior high math lab is designed to provide students with additional opportunities to practice and review math concepts as well as prepare for state standardized tests. Placement in this class is based on student performance on benchmarks.

 



 
   
 

JH ELA Lab

   

Junior high ELA lab is designed to provide students with additional opportunities to improve reading comprehension and writing skills as well as prepare for state standardized tests and benchmarks. Placement in this class is based on student performance on benchmarks.

 



 
   
 

Acting I

   

Introduction to Acting concepts utilizing the Meisner Technique. No prior experience necessary. Students will engage in exercises, scene work and monologues. Admittance to this course is based on teacher recommendation.

  Prerequisites:
None


 
   
 

Junior High Art

   

This course is for 7th - 8th grades.
Junior High Art will explore the elements and principles of art and design through a variety of two and three dimensional mediums. We will incorporate art history and studio process throughout the year.

  Prerequisites:
None.

Materials Fee:
$ 20.00


 
   
 

Latin I

   

This course is for 9th - 12th grades. (If space allows may be available for honors 8th grade)
Latin I is an introduction to Latin focusing on vocabulary, conjugation, declension and grammar. Course matrix will be provided at the beginning of the semester.

  Prerequisites:
None.


 
   
 

Spanish I

   

This course is for 8th - 12th grades.
Spanish I is designed to introduce students to elementary aspects of Spanish language and to the cultures of Spanish speaking people. Emphasis is given to establishing a strong foundation in comprehension and basic communication on simple, everyday topics. Students will be able to comprehend main ideas and some detail on familiar topics and will be able to write an organized letter or narrative story on a simple, familiar topic. 8th grade students must be in Honors classes.

  Prerequisites:
None.


 
   
 

PE/Health

   

This course is for 6th - 12th grades.
In this physical education course, students will be exposed an introductory array of sports, workouts, exercises and training regimens. Students will learn basic rules, skills, and guidelines and benefits of sports and exercise and will be able to explain and teach purposes of them. Students will learn basic health, cellular structure, anatomy, muscles and how they work together.

Student will be exposed to but not limited to: cardio, circuit training, soccer, basketball, pickle ball, flag football, volleyball and many others. The teacher will be proactive in guiding the students through general technique. Formative assessments will be heavily utilized in this class.

After completing this course, the student should have more confidence in his or her ability to perform sport activities. Students will understand the positive effectiveness and longevity in one’s health through a continuing of said activities. PE/Health is a physical education class along with a health class.

  Prerequisites:
None.


 
   
 

Culinary/Nutrition

   

This course is for 7th - 12th grades.
Culinary/Nutrition is a TWO period class that will provide students an introduction to proper nutrition, proper food handling, kitchen safety, dining etiquette, smart shopping and a final exam portfolio they will build in class as their final exam.

  Prerequisites:
None.

Materials Fee:
$ 25.00


 
   
 

Creative Writing

   

This course is for 7th - 8th grades.
The Creative Writing elective is designed for students interested in writing for publication. It will expose students to a variety of writing genres and require them to understand, analyze, imitate and then produce pieces of writing which conform to these genres. The writing process will be emphasized, as will be teacher, peer and self-critique. The students will write, revise, critique, cull and publish their own creative works.

  Prerequisites:
None.


   
 

Acting 1

 

Instructor: David Blanchard
E-Mail:dblanchard@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

Acting 1 is an entry level acting class for beginners and those students with an interest in the performing arts. This class will focus on basic acting principles such as simple dialogue, moment to moment exploration, truth, and an emphasis on behavior over verbalization. The primary goal of this class is to allow students to become comfortable being in front a group of people, memorizing and speaking lines from scripts, becoming more spontaneous and free and learn that the definition of acting as “The reality of doing under imaginary circumstances”.

Students will be learning a variety of specific acting techniques from an array of great teachers such as Uta Hagen, Constantin Stanislavski, Stella Adler and Sanford Meisner. They will engage in “The Repetition Exercise” where they will partner up and repeat a phrase or line to diminish the importance of words and begin to play off of behavior. Implementation of the “3 Moment Game” is an exercise where the student will ask a partner a series of sharp questions to elicit an emotional response and then attempt to identify the specific behavior. “Independent Activity” is an exercise to challenge the students’ creativity and imagination while developing concentration and focus. They must bring an item of their choice to class and do something with it that has difficulty, meaning and justification. Finally, students will receive a few texts and read with a partner, break down the basic action of the scene and at the end of the semester, will do a final scene in class.

In conclusion to this course, students will be more comfortable in front of an audience, gain self- confidence, have more knowledge of acting history and methods and have a better grasp of reading, speaking and analyzing basic text.
Prerequisites:
Entry into this course is subject to a student/instructor interview.



 
Required Materials:
  • A spiral notebook
  • Black and red pens


Text Selections:
  • Respect for Acting
  • On Acting
  • The Art of Acting

   
 

Acting 2

 

Instructor: David Blanchard
E-Mail:dblanchard@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

Acting 2 is an intermediate acting class which will explore deeper, more emotionally challenging territory. The primary goal of this course is to refine the rudimentary acting student into a more rounded and efficient artist by building upon the training from Acting 1. This course will explore the complex nature of emotion and how to manipulate it, create relationships and study the craft of doing monologues. Students will also learn how to build a character which will require physical and psychological adjustments. Most of the work in this course will require the student to work in front of the class on a daily basis, thus expanding their comfort level, skill and confidence.

Students will learn how to become emotionally free and “alive” by exercises focusing on daydreaming and fantasy and then incorporating “The Repetition Exercise” from Acting 1. Through the use of various texts and scripts from published writers, the acting student will learn how to create a specific relationship by “sound conditioning”. This course will also focus on monologues or “solo scenes” by using the text “Spoon River Anthology” by Edgar Lee Masters. Selections will be read in front of the class and subsequently broken down and then performed. Finally, students will work on creating a character by the use of impediment work and the “picture exercise” by Strasberg. Scene work will be applied to enhance and develop each of these individual lessons.

By the end of this course, students will be able to effectively meet more complex acting challenges, have a deeper understanding of breaking down text and dialogue, have deeper knowledge of writers and literature and have significantly more overall confidence in performing in front of an audience. The completion of this course will take a relatively novice acting student and turn them into a well- rounded, self- assured performing artist.
Prerequisites:
Students must have completed Acting 1 and are to conduct an entrance interview with instructor.



 
Required Materials:
  • A spiral notebook
  • A highlighter
  • Black and red pens


Text Selections:
  • On Acting (Meisner)
  • Respect for Acting (Adler)
  • Spoon River Anthology (Masters)

   
 

ADTSEA Driver Education

 

Instructor: Sharon McConkey
E-Mail:smcconkey@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333 x11074

ADTSEA Driver Education covers the 45 National Curriculum Standards. In 2009, the Novice Teen Driver Education and Training Administrative Standards (NTDETAS) were developed by representatives from the driver education professional community with assistance from the NHTSA to define the future of driver education and assist in improving the delivery of driver education programs nationally.

The "Driver Education Classroom" guide is divided into 13 units or 90 hours of classroom instruction and 50 hours of in-car instructional homework. The curriculum provides unit quizzes with 10 quiz questions at the end of each unit. At the end of the Semester there will be a Final Exam. An 80 % or better is required on the final to pass this class.

Topics covered include:

  1. Introduction to Novice Driver Responsibilities and the Licensing System
  2. Getting Acquainted with the Vehicle
  3. Understanding Vehicle Control: Starting, Steering, and Stopping
  4. Traffic Control Devices and Laws
  5. Vision and Space Management
  6. Basic Maneuvers in a Low Risk Environment
  7. Risk Reducing Strategies for Different Driving Environments
  8. Sharing the Road with Other Users
  9. The Effects of Distractions on Driving
  10. Adverse Driving Conditions and Emergencies
  11. Impaired Driving
  12. The Effects of Fatigue and Emotions on Driving
  13. Travel Planning, Loading, Towing, and Driving Special Vehicles

Prerequisites:
To be successful in Drivers Education, students need to be of driving age and have a Driving Permit.

 
Required Materials:
  • Driving Permit
  • #2 pencils and erasers
  • 1 1/2 in 3 ring binder and loose-leaf paper for Drivers Education (all class handouts will be 3-hole punched)
  • Arizona Driver License Manual and Customer Service Guide http://www.azdot.gov/docs/default-source/mvd-forms-pubs/99-0117.pdf?sfvrsn=11
  • Recommended Reading
    HOW to DRIVE: The Beginning Driver's Manual textbook, 14th edition, published by the American Automobile Association, 2011


Lesson plans for the class will be posted for all to view on http://classjump.com/s/smcconkey/

   
 

AP-2D Design

 

Instructor: Lauren Miller
E-Mail:lmiller@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

AP 2D design is a course for only the most serious art students, specifically students considering a career in some form of the arts, as the course is designed to help students earn college credit through the AP program. There will be a fee at the end of the course for submitting the portfolio to College Board for AP credit consideration.

This course will require a significant amount of effort and commitment on the students’ part. As stipulated by the AP Portfolio requirements, students will work to complete a minimum of 24 pieces for their portfolio. In the first semester, students will complete a minimum of 12 pieces for the Breadth portion of the portfolio, which asks that students demonstrate mastery in a variety of 2D media including graphite, charcoal, and ink drawing, watercolor and acrylic painting, printmaking, collage, digital art, etc. The second semester students will complete a minimum of 12 pieces for the Concentration portion of the portfolio, which asks that students focus on a central concept or theme to produce a unified body of work. Students will also learn how to photograph, matte and submit digital slides of their work.

There are summer assignments associated with this course, as well as weekly sketchbook homework assignments. This course is designed to empower students to make art a central focus of their lifestyle, and to facilitate the development of observational, organizational and expressive habits that will help ensure their success at college and in the arts-related workplace.

Critique at this level will focus on evaluating pieces using the AP rubric, designed to reflect the expectations of college level courses. There will be continued focus on art history, art theory and contemporary movements within the arts, as well as special focus on the arts and visual cultures impact on society at large, and the roles and responsibilities of artists within their communities.

Prerequisites:
Students must have completed two full years of high school level art coursework in good standing with the instructor to be admitted into AP 2D Design, as there is a tremendous responsibility and commitment level required to succeed in this course.


 
Required Materials:
  • There is a mandatory $20 studio fee for this course. In addition to this fee, students are required to have the following supplies:
  • A sketchbook (minimum 8.5"x11")
  • A minimum 16"x20" drawing pad
  • 2B - 6B drawing pencils (NO MECHANICAL PENCILS ALLOWED)
  • A sharpener
  • A large eraser
  • A kneaded eraser
  • Pressed (NOT VINE) charcoal
  • A ruler
  • Watercolor Paints
  • Acrylic Paints
  • Brushes
  • Watercolor Paper
  • Canvas Boards

   
 

Art III/AP-2D Design

 

Instructor: Lauren Miller
E-Mail:lmiller@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

AP 2D design is a course for only the most serious art students, specifically students considering a career in some form of the arts, as the course is designed to help students earn college credit through the AP program. There will be a fee at the end of the course for submitting the portfolio to College Board for AP credit consideration.

This course will require a significant amount of effort and commitment on the students’ part. As stipulated by the AP Portfolio requirements, students will work to complete a minimum of 24 pieces for their portfolio. In the first semester, students will complete a minimum of 12 pieces for the Breadth portion of the portfolio, which asks that students demonstrate mastery in a variety of 2D media including graphite, charcoal, and ink drawing, watercolor and acrylic painting, printmaking, collage, digital art, etc. The second semester students will complete a minimum of 12 pieces for the Concentration portion of the portfolio, which asks that students focus on a central concept or theme to produce a unified body of work. Students will also learn how to photograph, matte and submit digital slides of their work.

There are summer assignments associated with this course, as well as weekly sketchbook homework assignments. This course is designed to empower students to make art a central focus of their lifestyle, and to facilitate the development of observational, organizational and expressive habits that will help ensure their success at college and in the arts-related workplace.

Critique at this level will focus on evaluating pieces using the AP rubric, designed to reflect the expectations of college level courses. There will be continued focus on art history, art theory and contemporary movements within the arts, as well as special focus on the arts and visual cultures impact on society at large, and the roles and responsibilities of artists within their communities.

Prerequisites:
Students must have completed two full years of high school level art coursework in good standing with the instructor to be admitted into AP 2D Design, as there is a tremendous responsibility and commitment level required to succeed in this course.


 
Required Materials:
  • There is a mandatory $20 studio fee for this course. In addition to this fee, students are required to have the following supplies:
  • A sketchbook (minimum 8.5"x11")
  • A minimum 16"x20" drawing pad
  • 2B - 6B drawing pencils (NO MECHANICAL PENCILS ALLOWED)
  • A sharpener
  • A large eraser
  • A kneaded eraser
  • Pressed (NOT VINE) charcoal
  • A ruler
  • Watercolor Paints
  • Acrylic Paints
  • Brushes
  • Watercolor Paper
  • Canvas Boards

   
 

Art 1

 

Instructor: Lauren Miller
E-Mail:lmiller@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

High School Art I will introduce students to the practice, theory and history of art making from the Paleolithic Era to Contemporary Art. This course will focus heavily on understanding the principles of design: proportion, space, balance, repetition, harmony and rhythm, as well as properties of color such as value, hue, tint, shade and color relationships like split complementary and triadic schemes. There will be an emphasis on building a strong foundation in basic drawing skills, the foundation of all art-making. In the second semester, we will focus on 3D arts, where students will look at architecture, fashion design and industrial design, as well as traditional sculpture as a means of creation.

Throughout the semester, students will do a series of contour and volumetric drawing exercises designed to build on and improve their hand-eye coordination and understanding of special relationships. They will also do a line landscape drawing, an erase out still life drawing, a grid-based pencil portrait, a watercolor landscape, a printmaking project and a painted portrait. In the second semester, students will be making an architectural maquette, a figurative sculpture, a vessel sculpture, and a found object assemblage. Students will also actively participate in the critique process upon completion of each assignment, where they will be expected to discuss their work, and give and receive constructive criticism in an effort to improve the artwork. They will also have a major artist project in the second semester where they will have to put together a 15 minute presentation on an assigned artist, and teach said artist to their peers.

This course is designed around the NAEA Standards for grades 9-12, with the expectation that students will attain the level of proficiency in all standards areas by the end of the year. By the end of this course, students will be able to recognize the elements and principles of art in composition, understand how the picture plane relates to the composition, to take care of equipment and supplies properly, draw with various media, recognize and be able to name artwork from a number of artists, and paint with watercolor and acrylic paint. They will be able to work in clay, build a maquette to scale, and understand the basics of 3D creation. They will also be able to discuss art in a meaningful way, using appropriate vocabulary to do so.

 
Required Materials:
  • There is a mandatory $20 studio fee for this course. In addition to this fee, students are required to have the following supplies:
  • A sketchbook (minimum 8.5"x11")
  • 2B and 6B drawing pencils (NO MECHANICAL PENCILS ALLOWED)
  • A sharpener
  • A large eraser
  • A ruler
  • OPTIONAL:
  • Brushes
  • Watercolor and Acrylic Paint
  • Canvas Boards
  • Uni-Ball pens in black

   
 

Art 2

 

Instructor: Lauren Miller
E-Mail:lmiller@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

High School Art 2 will build on the skills and knowledge acquired in Art 1, and take student art-making to the next level in terms of intellectual awareness and process focus. In Art 2, students will have much more freedom in terms of subject matter content, but will be required to justify and explain both the meaning and process behind each project. There will also be an emphasis on elevated technique, meaning that students will be expected to demonstrate a skill set above and beyond the previous year’s standards, using one and two point perspective in drawing, rules of proportion in life drawing, varied stroke and blending techniques in painting, etc. There will also be an increased focus on cultural aesthetics and how we define and prioritize art as a society, and art as a means of social commentary and engagement. There will also be an increased focus on Art History, and students should be able to identify the most prevalent artistic movements and schools from the Renaissance through Pop Surrealism.

The first quarter of the school year will be spent on advanced skill-building drills with a focus on drawing (still life, life drawing, landscape, etc). The second quarter will be focused on advanced skill building working with paint and color. The second semester, students will continue to build their skill set through the use of various media, and will have the opportunity to work in 3D as well. There will also be a major artist project, where students will be expected to evaluate and critique the major body of work of one contemporary artist, and explain and define the relevance of this artist’s work within the context of social commentary and/or activism.

Upon completing this course, students should understand the relevance of the cultural, personal, and intellectual impetus behind the making of art, and be able to discuss this effectively with their own art in the critique setting. This course is designed around the NAEA standards for 9-12 art, and by the end of the school year, students should have mastered the advanced criteria for each standard. They should be able to name and identify the works of various artists, and the genre each worked in. Students will also have a portfolio by the end of the year reflecting their ability to work in a variety of media while operating under a cohesive unified theme or concept.

Prerequisites
Students must have completed a full year of High School Art 1 in good standing with the instructor to be admitted into Art 2, as there is a tremendous responsibility and commitment level required to succeed in this course.

 
Required Materials:
  • There is a mandatory $20 studio fee for this course. In addition to this fee, students are required to have the following supplies:
  • A sketchbook (minimum 8.5"x11")
  • 2B and 6B drawing pencils (NO MECHANICAL PENCILS ALLOWED)
  • A sharpener
  • A large eraser
  • A kneaded eraser
  • Pressed (NOT VINE) charcoal
  • A ruler
  • Watercolor Paints
  • OPTIONAL: (Highly Recommended for Art 2)
  • Acrylic watercolor paints
  • Brushes
  • Watercolor Paper
  • Canvas Boards

   
 

Broadcasting

 

Instructor: Nicholas Sheppard
E-Mail:nsheppard@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

This course begins with student activities and skills development in the high school media center and it provides an overview of current aspects of TV and Digital Media found in the Maricopa area. Using programs sampled from daily TV and the Internet, students learn to identify the characteristics of commercials, talk shows, soap operas, sit-coms, episodic drama and other current programming. They learn how to operate TV production equipment in the Sequoia Pathway Academy Media Center, how to prepare materials for individual productions and presentations, how to create finished short programs on video, how to edit their materials in digital formats. Students will learn recording techniques and create media projects individually and in groups. Some projects will be presented on the school’s cable TV channel. Digital Media Level I -- For the academically inclined student who wishes to increase his/her knowledge of digital media. Emphasis is on the usage of multimedia, video and computer for making presentations... great tool for college! Selected computer applications will be studied and included as part of multimedia presentations, professional web/multimedia applications like Go Live and the Final Cut Pro video-editing suite will be available as an option. Community business members will jury final project. Students will also help produce the schools' television show. In addition, topics to be covered will include single camera news production, single camera documentary production, multi-camera remote production, sports television, television news, the talk show and interview technique, digital film making, editing, studio lighting, the mini-cam, audio editing, TV studio lighting and set design. Skills to be developed will include analysis of program content, scripts writing, preparation of materials and studio production, skillful use of production equipment, and editing of audio and video materials.

Required supplies for class: Textbook, workbook, notebook and writing instrument.

Grades earned by students are based on Class Participation, Homework, Projects, presentations, quizzes, presentations, and tests.

 
Required Materials:
  • A Flash Drive 8GB
  • #2 pencils and erasers (NO pens for math)
  • 1 1/2 in 3-ring binder and loose-lead paper (all class handouts will be 3-hole punched).


Lesson plans for the class will be posted for all to view on www.planbook.com

   
 

Career Planning

 

Instructor: Anthony Clark
E-mail: aclark@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

In Career Planning, students will be given an opportunity to think practically about their future employment. Students will have the opportunity to visit and hear from colleges and individuals in different career fields. Students will be given opportunities to research jobs, including what education is required for the job, what time commitments are needed, and what real-world compensation is likely for that job. Students will also practice resume writing, cover letters, and interview skills. Real world job applications, college applications may be utilized in this course. This course will be able to suffice for the state mandated ECAP requirements.

The class will take place in the real world. The Career Choices text and work books will be utilized in this course. In addition, students will be using the computer lab time to research different types of employment, learn job searching skills, and learn how to write a resume and cover letter. They will also learn interview skills and how to determine if the job they desire will allow them to live within the dreams they aspire to. An emphasis will be placed on how to budget and being fiscally responsible. This class will also utilize some of the information and show correlation to our Financial Literacy course.

Knowing full well that what a student thinks he/she may want to do later in life, will change. This class is intended to help students understand how to plan for a career. They should be able to successfully research different types of careers, to determine if it will suit their expected needs, to write a resume and interview for employment. And lastly, they should be able to determine if the career they want will afford them the lifestyle they want.

Prerequisites:
There are no prerequisites for this course.



 
Required Materials:
  • 1" binder
  • Flash Drive 2GB
  • Pencils
  • Highlighters (optional)

   
 

Film

 

Instructor: David Blanchard
E-Mail:dblanchard@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

Film class is a broad cross section of the history and significance of moving pictures within the world’s cultural landscape. Using text as well as visual media, film class will address the relevant current and historical impact of film on society on a global scale. The primary goals of the course are to develop critical insight into the many elements of the filmmaking process. Students will be exposed to film appreciation including the cultural value of film, how films communicate historical context and cross educational value as it relates to literature, history, science, mathematics and art.

Students will be exposed to a range of filmmakers from all over the world and will view films from the silent era all the way up to contemporary work. This course will study the works of Charlie Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock, Akira Kurosawa, Francis Ford Coppola, Steven Speilberg and Martin Scorcese just to name a few. The film will be paused at strategic points to illustrate camera work, lighting, acting moments, script strategy and editing moments, allowing for instruction and group discussion. Upon viewing films from these artists, students will be able to critically assess style, pacing, acting integrity, lighting elements, sound and editing practices as well as learning about historical relevance, political influence and technological advances.

By the end of this course, students will be able to write clear and effective evaluations of a multitude of film styles and have a more refined eye for overall film quality and will understand the function of film within society.

Prerequisites:
Students must have a signed waiver from a parent or guardian to enroll in this course.



 
Required Materials:
  • A spiral notebook
  • A highlighter
  • Black and red pens
  • A flash drive


Film Selections:
City Lights, Seven Samurai, City of God, Top Hat, Singing in the Rain, Triumph of the Will, On the Waterfront, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Godfather, Halloween, Pan’s Labyrinth, Raging Bull, Goodfellas, Reservoir Dogs, Saving Private Ryan, Schindler’s List, A Clockwork Orange, et al.

A Note From the Instructor:
Some of the films presented may contain language, violence and adult content that some students may find offensive. It is the policy of this instructor to select films that are sensitive to that issue while maintaining the original integrity of the selected works.

   
 

Free Style Tumbling

 

Instructor: Amy Bratlie
E-mail: abratlie@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

In this Free Style Tumbling physical education course, students will be exposed and introduced to Tumbling, Acro-gymnastics, and Parkour. They will learn the strength and flexibility workouts, needed to perform progressive skills. Students will learn basic rules, skills, and guidelines and benefits of exercise and will be able to explain and teach purposes of them. Students will be able to tell and teach basic progressions and will be able to put up to 4 skills together.

Students will be exposed to but not limited to: cardio, circuit training, weights, and cross fit type training. The teacher will be proactive in guiding the students through general technique. Formative assessments will be heavily utilized in this class.

After completing this course, the student should have more confidence in his or her ability to perform sport activities. Students will understand the positive effectiveness and longevity in one’s health through a continuing of said activities.

 
Required Materials:
  • Appropriate attire: clothes and shoes
  • Work ethic
  • Lock (if applicable)

   
 

General Physical Education

 

Instructor: Amy Bratlie
E-mail: abratlie@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

In this physical education course, students will be exposed an introductory array of sports, workouts, exercises and training regimens. Students will learn basic rules, skills, and guidelines and benefits of sports and exercise and will be able to explain and teach purposes of them. Students will learn basic health, cellular structure, anatomy, muscles and how they work together.

Student will be exposed to but not limited to: cardio, circuit training, soccer, basketball, pickle ball, flag football, volleyball and many others. The teacher will be proactive in guiding the students through general technique. Formative assessments will be heavily utilized in this class.

After completing this course, the student should have more confidence in his or her ability to perform sport activities. Students will understand the positive effectiveness and longevity in one’s health through a continuing of said activities.

 
Required Materials:
  • Appropriate attire: clothes and shoes
  • Work ethic
  • Lock (if applicable)

   
 

Leadership and Communication

 

Instructor: Justin Price
E-mail: jprice@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

In the Leadership and Communication elective, students will study some of the greatest world leaders, both past and present. Students will identify the characteristics that made them so great. Leaders come in many forms and from many backgrounds; students will look at religious, military, political, sports and other leaders. Students will compare and contrast the different styles and tools that leaders have used to get people to follow them. Students will also study communication and its importance to history and today. Proper communication techniques are a vital skill in today’s business and education world. Understanding communications will give students and upper hand moving forward with their education and in the business world.

Students will read and analyze speeches, battle plans, books, and other historical documentation to find the hidden intricacies that led each person to be a great leader. Students will conduct research and report back to the class on a leader of their choice. Students will practice written communication by writing different types of papers including informative and persuasive essays. Students will also practice public speaking by presenting information to the class on a regular basis. Students will compare the leaders and communications of the past and correlate them to events happening today and draw comparisons.

Upon completing this course students will be able to identify the characteristics that have drawn men and women from around the world to follow different leaders. Students will be able to compare leadership styles and begin to form their own leadership style. Students will finish the class with more confidence when speaking to their pears and understand the importance of communication skills. Finally students will finish the class with some of the tools to make them better leaders within our school, city, and society.

Prerequisites:
None



 
Required Materials:
  • 3-ring binder
  • Loose-leaf paper
  • One pack of 3x5 cards
  • Hi-lighter
  • Pencils (#2 and colored, if desired)

   
 

Open Art Studio

 

Instructor: Lauren Miller
E-Mail:lmiller@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

This club hour is designed to be an open studio and art workshop where students in the advanced art courses can continue working on their portfolio under instructor guidance, and will function primarily as an extension hour of the AP Art course. In addition to the practical application of art making, students in this club will engage in on-going critique and broader discussions of issues within the arts. This time will also be used for guest speakers and seminars related to the arts.

Prerequisites:
Students must either be enrolled in Art II or AP Art to enroll in this club hour, or have instructor approval.

 
Required Materials:
  • Supplies from art class

   
 

Psychology

 

Instructor: Justin Fox
E-Mail:jfox@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

Psychology focuses on individual behavior and why an individual thinks, feels, and reacts to certain stimuli. Major emphases will be placed on the history and practices within psychology, research methods, stages in childhood and adolescence, how the brain works, altered states of consciousness, psychological testing, social psychology and psychological disorders.

The purpose of this course is to prepare students for further study at the college level, and will be conducted much like a college level course. We will focus on developing critical thinking skills, identifying bias in writing and other forms of communication and learning to work collaboratively through debate and discussion of material. There will be a strong vocabulary building component, as well as exposure to modern and classic psychology texts and articles.

This class will have a large reading component. Students are expected to read the material and be prepared to discuss the material during class. Students will also take part in reading, analyzing and developing research questions/tests during mini-lab sessions.

By the end of this course students will have an understanding of the history of psychology, the scientific method and what psychologists do within different concentrations. Students will be able to identify the use of psychology in everyday communications and also to utilize some psychological methods to develop coping skills for daily stressors within their own life.

Prerequisites:
While there is no prerequisite for this course students should have had at least one year of high school science and/or a basic understanding of the human brain and scientific method.

 
Required Materials:
  • A spiral notebook (college ruled)
  • Black pens


Literature Selections:
  • Psychology: Principles in Practice (Text Book)
  • Selected Readings from:
    1. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks
    2. Scientific American Mind
    3. Other relevant readings

   
 

Theater History

 

Instructor: David Blanchard
E-mail: dblanchard@edkey.org
Phone: (520) 568-9333

Theater History is a linear historical study of the origin and development of the visual arts including stage craft, theater design and development, ancient to contemporary writing, lighting, set building and designing, directing, acting styles, transition into film and television elements and artistic folklore. The primary goal of this course is to develop critical thinking as it relates to the purpose of theater in an educational setting and how theater is used to communicate ideas, emotions and entertainment. There will be a strong emphasis on vocabulary development, historical and political contexts and mathematical principles dealing with scale and perspective. The class will be writing comprehensive and critical essays as per the Common Core Curriculum.

Students will be exposed to a variety of literature from Shakespeare, Sophocles, Euripedes, O’Neill, Tennessee Williams, Clifford Odets, and Arthur Miller, etc. as well as texts from Uta Hagen and Harold Clurman. Class will do group and individual readings, in class discussions, and write critical assessments relating to a specific piece. We will also act out some of the scene work from the selected plays and practice active, imaginative set design. As a result, students will develop a deeper understanding of context in regard to history, politics, socioeconomic influences and cultural overlap. Students will produce a variety of essays, critiques and will be writing a play. This class will also focus on Stage Craft, learning the ins and outs of proper professional terminology commonly used on stage and on film sets. Students will then get up in front of class and follow simple commands from the instructor to assess their understanding of basic stage traffic. Students will be tasked to design and create sets, scenery and costumes.

By the end of this course, students will be able to effectively identify specific styles in writing, historical events, mathematical elements of design, specific writers and actors. Students will also have a full understanding of professional terminology and practices regarding film, theater and TV. They will be more confident in their writing and reading comprehension skills having engaged in deep discussions and analysis of a wide spectrum of creative and scientific principles.

 
Required Materials:
  • A 1" binder exclusively for this class
  • A spiral notebook
  • A highlighter
  • Black and red pens
  • A flash drive


Literature Selections:
  • King Lear
  • Antigone
  • Prometheus Bound
  • A Doll's House
  • The Crucible
  • A Streetcar Named Desire
  • Waiting for Godot
  • The Homecoming


Other Text Selections:
  • Respect for Acting
  • On Directing
  • History of the Theatre